AzothGallery.com Michael Meier 1618 "Hic est Draco caudam  suam devorans"
 



Johnes Ruta, writer, ¨Mercurator¨
Independent Curator & Art Theorist.

Web Design

 
 
 
Past monthly exhibition venues
 
Exhibition Archive, 2015 ~ 2012
Exhibition Archive, 2011 ~ 2005

Playhouse-on-the-Green 177 State Street, Bridgeport,CT, 2003 - 2007.
The York Square Gallery 61 Broadway, New Haven,CT, 1988 - 2005.
 
 
 

Invisible Structures in Art
Art works by
Joanna Stuart, Maralyn Adlin, Adger Cowans

Artists' Reception: Saturday, September 9th, 2017, 4:00 to 6:30 PM.
Curated by: Johnes Ruta

Connecticut Hospice Gallery
100 Double Beach Rd
Branford, CT 06405
Directions

Exhibition: September 6 to 29, 2017 10AM - 8PM daily

 

Joanna Stuart "MOON OVER THE WATER" archival pigment print 16" x 22"
 
 

Joanna Stuart "ISLAND VILLAGE" archival pigment print 22" x 12"
 
 
Joanna Stuart
http://joannastuart.com/

Artist Statement:

"All of my art begins with photography and imagination. I store my photographic images in my "computer's studio,"
where I organize them, for example by subject or shape. My process begins with slicing these images onto my palette
of raw materials from which I create an entirely new visual and emotional experience. I transform and combine fragments of
selected photographic images to create an abstract collage or a collage of an imaginary scene. My body of work also
includes general and artistic photography.

"My art has been exhibited in CT, MA and NYC, and resides in homes in Denmark, England, Iceland, Israel,
Portugal, as well as the U.S."
 
 

Joanna Stuart "ISLAND VILLAGE" archival pigment print 22" x 12
 
 
Maralyn Adlin
 
 
Maralyn Adlin "Giant Acorn on Books" oil on canvas 15" x 24”

http://maralynadlin.com/

"We live in a world that is constructed or built by specific laws of nature. These forms exist in the natural world
and are reflected backto us through all the arts. There may be many ways to express the structures that underpin what
we see and hear even our DNAis made in this manner. It is who we are and how we are made.

"The structure which defines the works are not always visible on the surface but they are there underneath as
a scaffold to hold up a mirror of who we are and what we know to be true.

"As a painter I use objects or figures in interiors or landscape settings to express abstract realities which are less about literal representation or narrative. My story lies in paint and placement. I am interested in intersections, vortices, and patterns that happen when objects collide or stand apart to create a distinct tension in the negative areas. The goal is to unify the composition with form and color relationships that make a place of peace and calm or turn tension into stasis. Symbolism is currently playing a larger role in my work as I move slowly away from pure formalism and shift where one can piece together an additional story.

 
 
Maralyn Adlin "Tulips and Backlight" oil on canvas 22" x 28”
 


" I am a native New Yorker and a resident of Connecticut for the past 16 years. In my high school years I attended Saturday classes at the Art Student’s League in NYC and attended Pratt Institute School of Fine Art where I majored in painting. Many years later I attended C.W. Post College in Brookville, NY where I received a degree in art therapy. I have exhibited my paintings in NY and CT and currently teach drawing and painting in Southbury, CT. I am associated with City Lights Gallery in Bridgeport, CT.

 
 
Adger Cowans
 
 
Adger Cowans "Bridgeport" acrylics on canvas 18"h x 30"w

http://adgercowans.com/

Adger Cowans, now 81, is a fine arts photographer and abstract expressionist painter who has experimented with a myriad
of mediums over his artistic career. Renowned in the world of photography and fine art, his works have been shown
by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, International Museum of Photography, Museum of Modern Art, The Studio Museum
of Harlem, The Cleveland Museum of Art, Harvard Fine Art Museum, Detroit Art Institute, James E. Lewis Museum
and numerous other art institutions.

 
 
 
Adger Cowans "Geometry of Light" acrylics on canvas 20"h x 28"w
 
 
 

Circle in a Square
Mandala Collages by Alan Bisbort

Exhibition April 4 to 30, 2017

Artists' Reception & Talk: Saturday, April 22nd, 2:00 to 4:00 PM.
Curated by: Johnes Ruta

Hagaman Memorial East Haven Library
227 Main Street, East Haven, CT 06512

Directions

 

Alan Bisbort "THE NATURAL WORLD" photo collage 12" x 12"

 
 

Alan Bisbort "THE AGE OF TREES" photo collage 12" x 12"
 
 
Alan Bisbort
 

Alan Bisbort is a collage artist whose work has appeared in group and solo shows and in print and online publications.
His collages have beem featured for years in the Hartford Advocate (along with his writing on art, culture and politics),
American Libraries, and Bartcop. He has taught a class in collage making at Artsplace in Cheshire, Conn.

Alan is an editor and the author of several books, including Beatniks: Guide to an American Subculture, also White Rabbit & Other Delights: East Totem West, A Hippie Company, 1967-1969, and monographs on the artists Charles Bragg and Barry Kite and the photographer Edward Curtis. He teaches two classes for OLLI at UConn-Waterbury: “Paper Bullets: Propaganda in American History” and “Give Peace a Chance: A History of the Antiwar Movement” and is currently working on a book about American propagandistic art.

As a cultural activist, Alan was a personal friend of the renown wood-carving sculptor and innovative print-maker William Kent (1919-2012), a promoter of Kent's work and once-maligned reputation, and is now a Trustee of the William Kent Charitable Foundation.

"The mandala is a sacred symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism, representing the universe or the cosmos," writes Mr. Bisbort.
"The word “mandala” is derived from the Sanskrit word for “circle.” While I feel trepidation about adapting something
sacred to my own artistic purposes, I can find no other geometrical form than this “circle in a square” that speaks so eloquently without the need of thousands of words of explanation. First, the circular center of the mandala is pleasing to
the human eye and comforting to the brain. Second, the square border beyond the circle is just as important, enclosing and protecting the delicate inner egg filled with imagery waiting to be hatched.

"Collage making, with or without the mandala, contains an element of wish-fulfillment. That is, the artist is reworking pieces of reality into how he or she would like them to be or how he or she thinks they really should be seen. People are drawn to collage perhaps because that is the way we all really look at the world, taking pieces from here and there and trying to make coherent connections as we wander from place to place. The mandala, combined with collage, comes closest to fulfilling my own deepest wishes. Each of the collages in “Circle In A Square” is a separate planet in my imaginary solar system. When I am making mandala collages, I feel as if I am traveling through outer space, hoping to discover a new world that will have me."

 
 

Alan Bisbort "SURVEY VOYAGE" photo collage 12" x 12"

 

Alan Bisbort "CRAZY COMIX" photo collage 12" x 12"
   
 
 

Light: Observations and Response
paintings by SARAH WARDA and JUAN LUIS ANDREU LATORRE

ARTIST RECEPTION
Saturday, April 1st, 4 to 6 PM

Exhibition: March 28 - April 30, 2017

Curated by: Johnes Ruta
AZOTHGALLERY.COM


Lyric Hall
827 Whalley Avenue
New Haven, CT 06515

 

Sarah Warda "Telaviv Nocturne" acrylic on canvas 18" x 20"

Sarah Warda
 

Sarah Warda is a Connecticut artist. She studied with Harvey Dinnerstein at the Art Students League in NYC, and in workshops with Aaron Shikler. She is a graduate of the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts, where she studied with Deane G. Keller, Peter Zallinger, and Dan Gheno. She has also traveled extensively through France, Italy, and Spain, independently studying Master Works.

"My art is an expression of both my observations and an emotional spiritual response to the world around me," writes Ms. Warda. "When I paint, be it the human form or landscape, I am always striving to capture the “inner” life of my subject.Although my technique is deeply rooted in the traditional classical style as was my formal education, my approach to the subject begins on a very visceral level always seeking that which one cannot merely observe with the eye, but what lies beneath.

"Art, unlike today’s snapshot lifestyle, requires the viewer to take pause for more than 10 seconds. My goal is to draw the viewer in and perhaps evoke an emotional response.

"I hope that you the viewer stop for a while, to feel what I have shown you and draw something for yourself. As a classically trained artist my work has evolved to deal not only in in what one can see, but in the unseen force around us. I am equally interested in both the nature and “super” nature of my subject.

"It is important for me to capture more than the correct principle effects of light, shade, and color. I am concerned how these can be interpreted using intuition, emotion, and expression. If I had to find a term that would best characterize my work, I would say that I am a realistic expressionist." ~ Sara Warda

 
 

Sarah Warda "Harkness" oil on canvas 16" x 20"
 

Sarah Warda "Twilight" oil on canvas 18" x 32"
 

Sarah Warda's artwork most recently was in the 2016 Mayor Erin Stewart & New Britain Commission on the Arts exhibition, and many other exhibitions in recent years in Eastern Connecticut. She has won scholarships for painting from Carlton C.Wiggins, Robert M. Lynch, C.D. Batchelor, Wardlaw, and a 2001 Grant from the Urban Arts Initiative in partnership with the Connecticut Commission on the Arts. Her artwork is in many private and corporate collections.

 
 
Juan Andreu Lattore
 
Juan Luis Andreu holds a 2004 Ph. D. in Fine Arts from the University of Valencia, School of Fine Arts. Spain, where his thesis was "Integration and sculptural conception in the North American Architecture.Analysis of a plastic conjunction.” He also studied computer graphics, and earlier New Techniques in Bronze Casting Sculpture at Johnson Atelier of Princeton NJ, the University of Connecticut and the bronze foundry of Eduardo Capa in Arganda del Duero, Madrid, Spain, and Architectural Design, in the 1980s. Since Y2K, he has held simultaneous positions as Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at Quinnipiac University and Housatonic Community College, and as Master of Restoration and Professor of Carving at the New England Carousel Museum in Bristol.
 
 

Juan-Andreu "HARBOUR" 20" X 16" acrylic on canvas

 

Juan-Andreu "NECM BACK RAMP" 24" x 20" acrylic on canvas
  Juan writes: "I am presently exploring the form of my paintings, and feeling connected to it in a consistent dialogue with light and volume.I have my own aesthetic norms and I walk my own path. I work in the impressionist manner in combination with my creative and learning processes, searching my expressive language from a variety of subjects ranging from landscapes to the human figure. I use often sculpture as support and inspiration. My painting themes are usually architectural constructions that illustrate the landscape by complementing each other. I deal with the complexities and the characteristics of the subjects that are an appealing part of the plastic language that relates form and environment. My goal is to give meaning to that integration."
 
 

Juan Andreu "TREE" 23" x 28" acrylic on canvas
 

Curated by Johnes Ruta, http://AzothGallery.com/
203-387-4933 azothgallery@comcast.net
for Lyric Hall 203-389-8885.

 
 
Recent Exhibition
 
 
February Whimsy
Art works by
Ellen Papciak-Rose and Al Coyote Weiner

Exhibition February 2 to 28, 2017

Artists' Reception: Saturday, February 4th, 2:30 to 4:30 PM.
Curated by: Johnes Ruta

Hagaman Memorial East Haven Library
227 Main Street, East Haven, CT 06512
Directions

 
 
 
Al Coyote Weiner "Panache" acrylic on canvas 18" x 28"
 
 
 
Ellen Papciak-Rose "Dog Fight" mixed-media 18" x 24"
 
 
 
 
Al Coyote Weiner - Cul de Trap
acrylic on canvas, 18” x 32
Al Coyote Weiner
-- artist statement
Actor, singer, writer, professor, and artist, Al Coyote Weiner has made his mark in the art and entertainment world for over thirty years. His journey has spanned the east coast from New York to Florida, and then all the way to England.He took a run at acting in the 60’s, where he landed several minor acting roles, and more importantly, learned how to creatively find ways to support himself in the process. He was even able to secure a place with Lee Strasberg,a prominent acting coach, for lessons and advice.

Coyote also took time during this extended period to go to Coconut Grove, FL where he wrote and published his poetry, and then returned to the University of Bridgeport for courses in literature and writing.

Next, he decided to further his studies in Western Europe after seriously considering a Fulbright Scholarship offer for studies in India or Africa. Ultimately, he earned his MACW in Creative Writing from Antioch International University, in Oxford and London, England. Following these studies, he established a long list of creative writing credits including copywriting, songwriting, promotional literature, and freelance articles. In addition, he has authored a one-act play accepted for production at the National Theater of Australia, and has written an original full-length screenplay.

Coyote has discovered his passion and voice as a performer. He has an eclectic resume of performance experience all the way from community theatres to voice-over artist, to the Yale Drama School as a playwright. He has formerly served as an adjunct professor in film studies.

Starting in 2003, Coyote has embraced painting with a resolute focus, taking courses, showing his works,and joining organizations. Al Coyote Weiner has made the decision to be a life-long student of art.To date, oyote has had 17 one-man shows, participated in joint exhibitions, and been accepted for numerous juried shows.

~ Al Coyote Weiner, 2017

Al Coyote Weiner - Caravan
acrylic on canvas, 18” x 32

 

Ellen Papciak-Rose "Doggie TV Dinner"
mixed-media 24" x 18"
Ellem Papciak-Rose
-- artist statement
Ellen Papciak-Rose is a print-maker and mixed-media artist, originally from Meriden, now living on a small farm in Bethany. But for decades, she served in the U.S. Peace Corps in Botswana, Africa.

Also working in South Africa, she later became a printmaking technician for the Internationally renown artist William Kentridge. Ellen is presently an arts activist and a member of The Grove arts activist enclave in New Haven.

~ Ellen Papciak-Rose, 2016

 
Ellen Papciak-Rose "True Love: My Beating Heart"
mixed-media 20" x 18"
 
 
Al Coyote Weiner "Daddy Long Legs"
acrylic on canvas 18" x 28"
 
 
 
Recent Exhibition
 
WINTER SOLSTICE
Art works by
Connie Brown, Rosemary Cotnoir, Suzan Scott

Exhibition December 2 to 30, 2016

Artists' Reception: Saturday, December 28th, 5:30 to 7:30 PM.
Curated by: Johnes Ruta

Hagaman Memorial East Haven Library
227 Main Street, East Haven, CT 06512

 
Connie Brown - Lather
acrylic on linen, 30” x 30”
Connie Brown
-- artist statement
After focusing on sculpting for years then painting landscapes, I have become addicted to the puzzle of creating abstract imagery. Inspired by nature, my approach to painting is process oriented. Photographs I have taken are seed for the organic forms, lyrical lines, rhythms, patterns and colors that emerge in my current body of work.Recently, I have been further exploring distinct areas of a previous painting; this detailed composition is what propels me into my next abstraction.

I paint on linen in acrylic, various mediums, acrylic flow, pastes and water. I use large and small brushes, palette knives, squeegees, rags and my fingers.

Layers of large sweeping gestures generate dominant forms. I continuously refine and edit- adding and eliminating through means of rubbing, dripping, drawing, developing the surface and creating patterns
with mark making. Often densely painted areas coincide with translucent washed over forms, creating space and structure.

I paint abstractly because of the unpredictability of the process; thoughtfully considered, deliberate choices unearth new and unexpected adventures.

~ Connie Brown, 2016

Connie Brown - Plunge
acrylic on linen, 30” x 30”
Connie Brown - Ebb
acrylic on linen, 30” x 30”
Suzan Scott
-- artist statement
'...as a painter, my language is line and color and shape. they are my tools. they are my voice. made visible...' ~ sas, may 2016

'...the question is never: what am i looking at?
-- the question is: what do I see?’ ~ sas, july 2016

“I have created a way of art making that combines my interests in art, nature, and science. Nature informs my work and directs my eye; the effects of light, color and atmospherics feature prominently in my work. New visual information constantly presents itself to me. Close observation and awareness of the moment play a big part in my art practice.

The work begins outdoors with color sketches and drawings. Elements of light, color and shape draw my eye, as do patterns and relationships between objects. With each sketch, I search for just the right degree of abstraction, seeking to remove the obvious and allow me a more open interpretation.

When I move into the studio I often produce a number of small studies, working with a variety of media and a range of scales, in an effort to more fully develop what I’ve seen and experienced. I rely heavily on visual memory and intuition to create work
that is not time or site specific but evocative, specific, only to itself.”

~ Suzan Scott, July 2016

Suzan Scott - The Early Hours No.2
acrylic on canvas, 12” x 12”
 

 

Rosemary Cotnoir - Big Moon
oil on linen, 20” x 20”
Rosemary Cotnoir
-- artist statement
The subjects I paint vary, but I am attracted to bare trees. It is not a particular type of tree but more about the patterns and twisted shapes they form that interest me.

I sketch elements to find the most pleasing composition while making notes about color and light. Then I rely on memory and intuition to complete a painting. Sometimes I apply paint directly
to the canvas without having any particular direction other than color and imagination. When I begin this way, for me, the results are visually exciting.

Currently I am experimenting with patterns. Pattern is an underlying structure that organizes surfaces in a consistent regular manner. The forms I work with are derived from nature and classical motifs such as flow, branching, spirals, lines, dots and symbols. These are repeated intuitively so that they come together to be viewed in a pleasurable way as a whole.

~ Rosemary Cotnoir, 2016

 
Rosemary Cotnoir - Tree with Lichen
oil on linen, 20” x 16”
Rosemary Cotnoir - Something is Happening in the Woods
oil on linen, 16” x 20”
Suzan Scott - Atmosphere Sunrise No.7.2
acrylic on canvas, 12” x 12”
Suzan Scott - Atmosphere Sunrise No.1
acrylic on canvas, 12” x 12”
Suzan Scott - Atmosphere Sunrise No.7.2
acrylic on canvas, 12” x 12”
 
Recent Exhibition
 
 
Urban Vertigo
Art works by
Mounira Stott

Artist Reception: Saturday, November 11, 5:00 to 7:00 PM.
Curated by: Johnes Ruta
Lyric Hall
827 Whalley Avenue
New Haven, CT 06515

November 4 - December 11, 2016

  "Over the last ten years, since immigrating to the USA," writes Mounira Stott, "my work has been influenced more and more by my fascination with the modern city - its textures, rhythms and ever changing patterns –particularly New York City.  Ms. Stott came to the U.S. from Russia, where she received her B.F.A. from the Moscow College of Artistic Professions in 1992. She also studied and worked in the field of electronics and computers, previously receiving her M.S. in Automation and Remote Control Electronics from the Moscow Radio Technology Institute in 1981. and her B.S. in Computers, Instruments and Devices from the Rasplatin College of Radio-Technology in 1975.

"Initially I captured a more representational view of New York, focusing on the play of colors and planes within a clear representation of the scene at hand. More recently however I try to separate my representation of the texture and the rhythm of the city from my representation of its reality, to draw the viewer into an appreciation and a sense of those rhythms without losing his or her connection to their source – the reality of the city. By using a variety of unusual perspectives that surprise the viewer, he at first loses the city’s reality and sees only the ‘essence’ of its vitality in the light, color and planes of the painting. This essence reaches directly to his emotions rather than his mind. However, as the mind has a few minutes to digest what it sees it suddenly penetrates the surprising perspective and realizes that this is an urban landscape – and thus makes the connection.
"One might view the works therefore as almost completely abstracted and at the same time as almost completely representational. In some cases the works capture a very narrow segment of the city-- a part of a single structure for example, and in others, such as the aerial Urban Exploration series the city’s grand overall patterns and textures."

Mounira Stott's artwork is in many collections in the US and Russia, and has been shown in many venues including the Amsterdam Whitney Gallery, on the Upper West Side, NYC; the Blue Mountain Gallery, Chelsea, NYC; Ward-Nasse Gallery, SoHo, NYC; and NoHo Gallery, NYC; as well as at the CARTUS Corporation in Danbury, CT; and the Artwell Gallery in Torrington, CT, juried by Cynthia Roznoy, Ph.D, curator of the Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury. In Russia, her work was honored to be shown in the Artist's Guild Gallery, and to be in the Office of the President, the State Museum, and in the Ministry of Culture in Kazan, the Republic of Tatarstan.


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Curated by Johnes Ruta, http://AzothGallery.com/

 
Empire State Building
oil on linen, 48” x 36”
Night Towers
oil on linen, 48” x 36”
Manhattan Mist
acrylic on canvas 24" x 32"
Reflection III
acrylic on canvas, 18’’ x 18”

 

Urban Exploration I
oil on linen, 48” x 36”
Urban Exploration II
oil on linen, 48” x 36”
Urban Exploration III
oil on linen, 48” x 36”
River
acrylic on canvas, 18’’ x 18”
 
 
 
Abstract Realities
Art works by
Maralyn Adlin, Victoria Navin, Marjorie Gillette Wolfe,
and Henry L. Loomis (1943-2015).

Artists' Reception: Saturday, September 24, 4:00 to 6:30 PM.
Curated by: Johnes Ruta
Connecticut Hospice
100 Double Beach Rd
Branford, CT 06405
Directions

Exhibition: September 2 to 29, 2016 10AM - 8PM daily

 
Maralyn Adlin - "Green Bowl" acrylic on canvas 24" x 32"
Maralyn Adlin - "Red Flowers on Red Table" acrylic on canvas 24" x 32"
MARALYN ADLIN
maralynadlin.com

As a painter I use objects or figures in interiors or landscape settings to express abstract realities which are less about literal representation or narrative. My story lies in paint and placement. I am interested in intersections, vortices, and patterns that happen when objects collide or stand apart to create a distinct tension in the negative areas. The goal is to unify the composition with form and color relationships that make a place of peace and calm or turn tension into stasis. Symbolism is currently playing a larger role in my work as I move slowly away from pure formalism and shift where one can piece together an additional story.

I am a native New Yorker and a resident of Connecticut for the past 16 years. In my high school years I attended Saturday classes at the Art Student’s League in NYC and attended Pratt Institute School of Fine Art where I majored in painting. Many years later I attended C.W. Post College in Brookville, NY where I received a degree in art therapy.
I have exhibited my paintings in NY and CT and currently teach drawing and painting in Southbury, CT. I am associated with City Lights Gallery in Bridgeport, CT.

Henry L. Loomis (1943-2015) "Hallock Avenue Houses"
acrylic on canvas 30" x 42"
Henry L. Loomis (1943-2015) "Mother and Octuplets"
acrylic on canvas 18" x 30"
HENRY L. LOOMIS (1943-2015)

Henry Luther Loomis began making art when he was 5 years old, carving duck decoys and birds of wood. When he received his BFA at Yale Art School, his teachers were many of the noted academic artists of the century: Abstract painter Jack Tworkov was then head of the department, and favored Loomis' work. Bernard Chaet, later Art Department chair, was his instructor for landscape and cityscape painting, and taught him the connective horizon in the painting of the diptych pair. Lester Johnson taught him portraiture. Al Held taught him the continuities of painting in series, and Richard Lytle taught him the techniques of printmaking. In later life, Mr. Loomis suffered from a psychological malady which brought him into the world of Outsider Art.
He passed away in May, 2015, at the age of 72.

Marjorie Gillette Wolfe "Clinton 33"
framed archival pigment photograph
Marjorie Gillette Wolfe "Sepiessa Shoreline"
framed archival pigment photograph
MARJORIE GILLETTE WOLFE
marjoriewolfe.net

Marjorie Gillette Wolfe has been a photographer for four decades and was an art teacher for thirty-seven years. A New Haven native, her work often centers on structures, landscape, organic processes, and the environments in which they occur.

"Most striking in this thorough documentation of an artificial environment is the boundary work that Wolfe does with these membranes of vinyl and their fragile hold on the space between inside and out. These are the heat treasuries, made to counter weather and calendar in the service of floral commerce. But plastic can go to ruin, too, and its punctured surfaces through which the sky is visible might well offer a means of escape for plant convicts desperate for the risk of the world as it actually is."
~ Stephen Vincent Kobasa

Victoria Navin "Roofscape, Antigua, Guatemala" digital photograph
Victoria Navin "City of Wires, Guatemala" digital photograph
VICTORIA NAVIN

I am a self-taught photographer, primarily interested in landscape and natural phenomena. For inspiration, I look to trees, rocks and boulders, bodies of water and roofscapes. I am also interested in monumental architecture as well as the smaller details that define a location as unique, such as doors, windows, balconies and streetscapes.

I am a retired librarian who enjoys travel, and have recently visited Portugal, Thailand, Laos, Panama and Guatemala, which are the locations of my photography. My recent exhibits include: ATLANTIC AND SOUTHWESTERN ROCKS, New Haven Free Public Library, April 2015; WONDERS OF PORTUGAL, April 2014 and TREES OF LIFE, Wallingford Public Library, December 2013.

I am a graduate of Albertus Magnus College, and hold Master's Degrees from New York University, Georgetown University and Pratt Institute. Currently a resident of New Haven, CT, I have also lived in Brooklyn, Washington D.C., and Madrid.

 
 
Group Exhibition
 
<>
 
 
 
Winter Metaphors
Art works by
John Arabolos, Anne Doris-Eisner, Oi Fortin,
Allan Greenier, Frieda Howling, and Jacklyn Massari.

Artists' Reception: Saturday, January 9th, 2016
Curated by: Johnes Ruta
azothgallery@comcast.net

Hagaman Memorial East Haven Library
227 Main Street, East Haven, CT 06512

Directions

January 4th to January 31, 2016
Fawn Gillespie, Reference Librarian

 
Jacklyn Massari "Rain Boat"
watercolor and acrylic on paper, 11" x 15"
Jacklyn Massari "Church Hall"
in and watercolor on paper, 16" x 12"
Jacklyn Massari "Horse on Fire"
acrylic on paper, 18" x 20"
John Arabolos "Fabric of Life Series15 Matrix-1"
Digital Fractal photo on Aluminum, 42" x 42"

Oi Fortin "Sacred Rite"
Monotpe on paper, 24" x 18"

Allan Greenier "Abstract Field"
2-color aquatint, 15 1/2" x 9"
Allan Greenier "Garden"
silkscreen on Sekishu paper, 11" x 15"

Frieda Howling"Outer Space"
acrylic on canvas, 36" x 24"

Anne Doris-Eisner "Basic and Range"
acrylic on paper, 44" x 72"
Anne Doris-Eisner "Water Lessons"
acrylic on paper, 23" x 25"
 

Nature is the primary focus of my work,” says Frieda Howling ” -- sometimes the awesome forces of nature, other times the tranquility of nature.I see the environment as forms occupying space. My abstract shapes draw their strength from the firm basis in the natural forms of the landscapes. The artist has the privilege to translate nature's forms into various moods which will affect the inner and spiritual emotions of the viewer."
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Painter Anne Doris-Eisner states, "Living with acute awareness of the natural world has been a blessing. I have found inner strength by observing the resilience and transformative beauty of the land and all that grows from it as it moves through its life cycle. What is struck down, crushed, cut and splintered may become irreversibly changed, but yet still remains a part of this world."
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Seeking a creative outlet, Oi Fortin discovered a new passion -- Monotype. Oi loved the creative process of the monotype, the element of surprise and instant gratification of each new piece. She has found the printmaking studio to be a sanctuary, where she creates abstract monotypes with complex, rich colors, soaring compositions and action, that capture the imagination.
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I am interested in the art of the soul. I believe in its ability to facilitate healing. I have recently been able to learn about my self and health by creating consciously unconscious works of art. It has given me great insight into the state of my soul, and has brought my conscious and subconscious into alignment. My life has drastically changed in many different ways since I first began creating this way.
These works are part of a larger series, created by emotions. I continue to work this way to release any negativity I am feeling. I enjoy being a vector, and a facilitator to the work that is dying to be created, and learning about my true self.
~ Jacklyn Massari
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"Art for me has always been about the investigation of our natural world and the way we perceive and relate to it, says John Arabolos, Professor of Photography at the University of New Haven. “It not only has to do with the process of conceiving ideas and creating, but is also about the metaphysical act of experiencing and becoming.  As an artist, I want to bring the observer to the phenomenological brink or edge  where abstraction becomes subjective and identifiable.  The observer will then rely
upon their own subconscious ability to visually think and conceptually assemble the given information
to see that invisible part of the form that the imagination transforms and creates into an identifiable image." 

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"I am in love with the iterative nature of printmaking, the sensuous nature and infinite
varieties of paper and ink. I like the dialectic between the technical demands of realizing
a print and the free nature of initial image making. I am happiest when a picture surprises
me on it’s way to a finished print." ~ Allan Greenier


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John Arabolos
"About my Fractal Photographic Artwork"

The artwork of John Arabolos is an investigation of “Chaotic” patterns found in nature. These are patterns that have what is described as, “self-similarity”. That is to say; compositional elements, that are readily identifiable as the same, yet varying in size and scale and existing randomly in placement within space and time. He investigates these phenomena, by utilizing symmetry as a tool, thus forcing and creating order out of randomness. The resulting patterns, though organic in origin, become manipulated abstractions from nature, defying identification relative to their size, scale and lack of subjective reference. Consequently this leaves viewers no tangible content to grasp in order to identify the images they are confronted with. This forces the viewer to subliminally rely on their own past empirical experiences and observations to formulate a response. In many ways the artwork is an investigation about size or more specifically; how we perceive scale and rate of change. John posits, “Because the phenomenology of intuitiveness is inextricably linked to Chaos theory and the fractals which represent the evolving randomness of form in nature, my investigation becomes a profound insight into how nature works and how we as beings of consciousness realize our environment. This is the crux of perception, art making, and the experiencing process. What is size?…and in relationship to what? How do we determine scale, when through abstraction we do not have a frame of reference to base our perceptions and observations? What is size - but an individual’s physiological intuitive response to his/her own environment?” This current body of work represents a smaller part of a larger quest and search to document a universal aesthetic language through an analytic methodological approach in the perceiving, manipulation and illustration of an intuitive set of naturally evolving circumstances. John’s recent artwork, “Chaotic Symmetries - The Fabric of Life Series”©, utilizes multiple generations of complex image symmetry in natural unaltered color, to create very intricate patterns on a grand scale with methodology based upon the science of symmetry, universal geometric morphological sequencing and related mathematical algorithmic principals to aesthetically control and create both order and systemic structure from random organic imagery. Based upon the graphic algorithm John developed to create his artwork, in July of 2008 he filed for a patent for a new “Disruptive Technology” for creating systemic morphological pattern sequencing. This design methodology enables the creation of an infinite number of self referential patterns from any given pictorial reference. Although development is still ongoing, the process is currently being used for the creative development of pattern sequencing within the “Graphic Image Terrain” by design professionals in the fine and applied arts of the Interior, Architectural, Textile, Graphic Design and Education industries. In the summer of 2013 the domestic and patents was approved. The European Patent is still pending .The process can be seen and utilized as on online design tool, at “Image Terrain.com”.

~ John Arabolos

 
 
Group Exhibition
 
Of the Land, Sea, and Sky
Art works by
John Arabolos, Anne Doris-Eisner, Oi Fortin,
Frieda Howling, Evie Lindemann, Norian Agudelo de Mejia.

Artists' Reception: Thursday, December 10th, 2015, 5 to 7 PM.
Curated by: Johnes Ruta



100 Double Beach Road, Branford, CT 06504

(please click on image or address for map)

Exhibition December 4, 2015 to January 7, 2016
Katherine Blossom, CT Hospice Arts Director

 
Anne Doris-Eisner "Water No.2"
acrylic on paper, 22" x 30"
Oi Fortin "Ritual"
Monotype print, 24" x 18"
Noriam Agudelo de Mejia "Perpetuity of the Human Generation"
oil on canvas, 24" x30"
John Arabolos "Morpho Retenor HMPR--x1-1"
Hi-resolution Fractal digital photo, 36" x 36"
Evie Lindemann "The Shaman"
Monotype print, 20" x 15"
 
Seeking a creative outlet, Oi Fortin discovered a new passion -- Monotype. Oi loved the creative process of the monotype, the element of surprise and instant gratification of each new piece. She has found the printmaking studio to be a sanctuary, where she creates abstract monotypes with complex, rich colors, soaring compositions and action, that capture the imagination.

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Painter Anne Doris-Eisner states, "Living with acute awareness of the natural world has been a blessing. I have found inner strength by observing the resilience and transformative beauty of the land and all that grows from it as it moves through its life cycle. What is struck down, crushed, cut and splintered may become irreversibly changed, but yet still remains a part of this world."

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Noriam Agudelo de Mejia's paintings show a development through several stages of her personal artistic style. In earlier work, color usage goes from gradations of muted colors within various tonal ranges but evolves in later work into expressions of harmoniously contrasted bright rhythmic values. The composition of the canvas field evolves from topological layouts of similar figures into a deeply inspiring and poignant telling of the story between two or three figures -- including symbolized forms such as the white dove of an ascending soul. The artist, originally from Columbia, SA, introduced a new movement in the art scene of her country in 1980, called "Primitive Modernism."

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"Nature is the primary focus of my work,” says Frieda Howling ” -- sometimes the awesome forces of nature, other times the tranquility of nature.I see the environment as forms occupying space. My abstract shapes draw their strength from the firm basis in the natural forms of the landscapes. The artist has the privilege to translate nature's forms into various moods which will affect the inner and spiritual emotions of the viewer."

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"California. India. Israel. Afghanistan. Connecticut. These are all places that I have lived and that hold the people I have loved and who have impacted me,” says Evie Lindemann. “My art work emerges from these intersecting influences. Making art is an aspect of my spiritual path. It opens me to attention toward my feelings, thoughts, wishes, disappointments, griefs, hopes, and longing for the Divine. Printmaking is the kind of medium that mirrors back elements of the deep psyche, revealing mystery, astonishment, and love. "My work: Associate Professor in the Master of Arts in Art Therapy Program at Albertus Magnus College.I train students in clinical work, teach courses on death and dying, and use Jungian therapeutic techniques such as mandalas and the MARI for transformational processes. I also teach at Yale University's Sherwin B. Nuland Summer Institute in Bioethics with  a focus on multicultural issues at the end of life."  

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   "Art for me has always been about the investigation of our natural world and the way we perceive and relate to it, says John Arabolos, Professor of Photography at the University of New Haven. “It not only has to do with the process of conceiving ideas and creating, but is also about the metaphysical act of experiencing and becoming.  As an artist, I want to bring the observer to the phenomenological brink or edge  where abstraction becomes subjective and identifiable.  The observer will then rely upon their own subconscious ability to visually think and conceptually assemble the given information to see that invisible part of the form that the imagination transforms and creates into an identifiable image." 
 
 
Group Exhibition
 
 
Nature's Storms and Forms
Art works by
Phil Falcone, Joseph K. Higgins, Michael Kozlowski,
Hilary Opperman, Mounira Stott, Cecilia Whittaker-Doe.

Artists' Reception: Saturday, October 3rd, 2:30 to 4:30 PM.
Curated by: Johnes Ruta
azothgallery@comcast.net

Hagaman Memorial East Haven Library
227 Main Street, East Haven, CT 06512

Directions

“Painting is a place to go – a place to inhabit. It’s the way we see the world through art.
It welcomes interpretation. For instance, the depiction of the movement of water
through a natural environment illustrates continual growth and change.
Perceived human and animalistic forms that evolve from the chaos suggest our
intrinsic connection to a natural environment that is both threatening and joyful.”
~ artist Cecilia Whittaker-Doe

Exhibition October 1 to 31, 2015
Fawn Gillespie, Reference Librarian

 
HIlary Opperman "Room to Soar"
encaustic mixed-media collage
Michael Kozlowski "Again 2"
Spray paint on canvas
Cecilia Whittaker-Doe "Uprooted"
oil / mixed-media on panel
Phil Falcone "Storm"
oil on canvas
Mounira Stott "Reflection 2"
oil on canvas
Joseph K. Higgins "Lyric"
color print from enamellized tile
 
 
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Group Exhibition
 
 
“Atomic War I, August 6 – 9, 1945”
A HIROSHIMA MEMORIAL

 
Interpretive Art works by

Alan Bisbort, Steven DiGiovanni, Allan Dudek, Phil Falcone, Joseph K. Higgins, Richmond Jones,
Peter Konsterlie, Michael Quirk, Lisa Seidenberg , K. Levni Sinanoglu, Cecilia Whittaker-Doe.

Artists' Reception: Thursday,
August 6th, 5 to 7 PM.
    New Haven Free Public Library Gallery
    (in the Business/Periodicals Room) 
    133 Elm Street, New Haven, CT 06510
 
 
 

NO MATTER WHAT THE POLITICAL OR STRATEGIC PURPOSE, THE MAKING OF WAR AND THE CYCLE OF KILLING, DEATH FOR DEATH, KILLING FOR REVENGE, OR KILLING FOR PROTECTION OR "SECURITY," AND THE SO-CALLED "SACRIFICES" OF A NATION'S OWN SOLDIERS -- THESE ARE ALL STILL THE MORAL EQUIVALENT OF MURDER ! The taking of any life undermines the future potential of mankind, and rubs out a light of consciousness, and becomes a dark spot on the soul of Humanity.
~johnes ruta

Thursday, August 6th, 2015 is the exact 70th Anniversary day of the dropping of the 16 kiloton Atomic Bomb of Hiroshima, Japan, a city built on a wide river delta. During World War II, the city was the headquarters of Japan's 2nd General Army, a base of Army Marines, and a key shipping port.

On Monday, August 6, 1945, at 8:16 a.m., the nuclear bomb "Little Boy” was dropped on Hiroshima by an American B-29 bomber, the Enola Gay flown by Colonel Paul Tibbets, directly killing an estimated 80,000 people. In a 2 mile wide firestorm, many were vaporized outright, and tens of thousands burned to death, or survived briefly with excrutiating burns. By the end of the year, injury and radiation brought the total number of deaths to 90,000–166,000. The population before the bombing was around 340,000 to 350,000. Approximately 70% of the city's buildings were destroyed, and another 7% severely damaged. One month later, on September 17th, 1945, a typhoon additionally struck the area, destroying bridges and killing more than 3,000 people. In 1946, the novelist John Hersey visited the city, and in his Pulitzer Prize winning book Hiroshima, documented the experiences told to him by survivors of the horrific and devasting nuclear bomb.

During the course of the war, the “conventional incendiary bombing of Tokyo and other cities had caused widespread destruction and hundreds of thousands of deaths. For example, Toyama, an urban area of 128,000 people, was nearly destroyed, and incendiary attacks on Tokyo claimed the lives of 100,000 people. There were no such air raids on Hiroshima, but a real threat was recognized, and to protect against potential firebombings in Hiroshima, school children aged 11–14 years had been mobilized to demolish houses and create firebreaks.

Following protracted heavy combat on Pacific Islands, such as Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima, Okinawa, and Saipan, Harry Truman, now President following the death of Franklin Roosevelt in April, decided on this nuclear attack, either to end the war quickly with Japan's surrender, or to destroy it city by city. The subsequent atomic bombing of the Japanese industrial valley city of Nagasaki on August 9th, killed around 80,000 individuals.

 
 
Alan Bisbort "Bombing" mixed media on canvas
Alan Bisbort "Bomb Mandala" mixed media on canvas
K. Levni Sinanoglu "Ashes" 15x15 Sumi-Ink and Graphite on Paper
K. Levni Sinanoglu "Bird Tree Bomb"
15x15
Sumi-Ink and Graphite on Paper
Michael Kozlowski "Again 2" 20" x 24" Spray paint on canvas
Michael Kozlowski "Silence" 36" x 48" Spray paint on canvas
Richmond Jones "Sandy Hook Memorial Park Proposal"
click to visit artist website
Peter Konsterlie "Major Joe" 16" x 12" watercolor on paper
 
Exhibition: August 4 - 31, 2015.
Curator: Johnes Ruta, 203- 387- 4933 azothgallery@comcast.net
 
 
Playhouse-on-the-Green 177 State Street, Bridgeport,CT, 2003 - 2007.
The York Square Gallery 61 Broadway, New Haven,CT, 1988 - 2005.